Imagine

There was a reason I never praised Mitt Romney for his short but ostensibly gracious concession speech on election night.

I suspected someday, sooner or later, that speech, like the one who delivered it, would be exposed as disingenuous. And so it has.

He said in that speech:

The nation, as you know, is at a critical point. At a time like this, we can’t risk partisan bickering and political posturing.

Oh, yeah?

The very first time we hear from Romney after he gave that speech, after he said “we can’t risk partisan bickering and political posturing,” we hear courtesy of The New York Times, which reported on remarks he made during a conference call to his campaign’s national finance folks, you know, “his” folks, those able to raise and donate large sums of money.

Now, we know from experience that in front of his kind of folks Mittens is free to be himself, as he was before those fat cats in Boca Raton. He told them, when he thought the rest of us weren’t listening, that nearly half of all Americans are moochers, a claim that dovetailed nicely with one of his campaign assertions that those who want “free stuff” should look elsewhere.

And, according to Romney’s latest remarks, they did.

On the phone with those fundraisers and moneyed donors who helped finance his campaign (one of the participants allowed The New York Times to listen in), Romney whined that he lost the election because President Obama gave free stuff to “the African-American community, the Hispanic community and young people.”

Part of that free stuff was health care:

Free contraceptives were very big with young, college-aged women. And then, finally, ObamaCare also made a difference for them, because as you know, anybody now 26 years of age and younger was now going to be part of their parents’ plan, and that was a big gift to young people.

Damn those kids! Why should they want health care?

But he said there were others who wanted it too:

You can imagine for somebody making $25,000 or $30,000 or $35,000 a year, being told you’re now going to get free health care, particularly if you don’t have it, getting free health care worth, what, $10,000 per family, in perpetuity — I mean, this is huge. Likewise with Hispanic voters, free health care was a big plus.

You can imagine,” he said to those well-off campaign financers. “You can imagine” what it would be like to not have the money to get health care. “You can imagine” how happy you would be if suddenly you could get health care for your kids, or, God forbid, for yourself. “You can imagine,” he said to folks who aren’t in the business of imagining such things.

Imagine, indeed.

Imagine if Mitt Romney had become president.

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8 Comments

  1. Yellow Dog

     /  November 15, 2012

    He’s a maggot. Just like the rest of them. White man speak with hateful tongue.

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    • I prefer “vulture capitalist” to “maggot” for obvious reasons (people understand the former as a criticism of his livelihood and the latter as merely a personal epithet), but I admit that calling Mittens “a soft-bodied legless grub” has a nice ring to it! (Just kidding.)

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  2. Imagine no possessions
    I wonder if you can
    No need for greed or hunger
    A brotherhood of man
    Imagine all the people
    Sharing all the world…

    You may say I’m a dreamer
    But I’m not the only one
    I hope someday you’ll join us
    And the world will live as one

    — John Lennon

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    • Imagine indeed. Very appropriate, Herb. And Duane, good post. We need wonder no more who the real Mitt Romney was, he was the 47% guy in the Boca Raton video clip.

      Mitt said (emphasis added),

      “You can imagine for somebody making $25,000 or $30,000 or $35,000 a year, being told you’re now going to get free health care, particularly if you don’t have it, getting free health care worth, what, $10,000 per family, in perpetuity — I mean, this is huge. Likewise with Hispanic voters, free health care was a big plus.”

      My BS meter pegged when I saw the figure of $10,000 in his quote. That may be “huge” when he’s talking about giving it to the little people, but it wasn’t so “huge” in the primary debates when he casually offered that amount in a bet with Rick Perry. To Mitt, that’s just pocket change. Oh, the irony.

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    • Appropriate, particularly since we just passed what would have been Lennon’s 72nd birthday. Can you believe that?

      Duane

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  3. Treeske

     /  November 15, 2012

    Great post Duane, as are the comments!

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  4. Jane Reaction

     /  November 18, 2012

    Nice touch Duane, especially your characterization of the 1% as “folks who aren’t in the business of imagining such things”. Only such like-minded folks would presume that the under-26 women of America HAVE parents with health insurance, or that Hispanics get “free health care”.

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