Holy Second Amendment Remedies

The Second Amendment is sacrosanct.”

—Alex Jones, radio host

sacrosanct: 1: most sacred or holy : inviolable;
                       2: treated as if holy: immune from criticism or violation

because it reveals something scary about the mentality of people who believe in unfettered gun rights, I’m posting both parts (Part 2 is a must see) of Piers Morgan’s interview of a quite unhinged right-wing radio host named Alex Jones, who created a petition to have Morgan deported for his stance on guns.

Jones, of course, fears the government may someday come after him and his fellow gun worshipers—he believes, for instance, that the feds were behind the Oklahoma City bombing and 9/11—and he needs guns to defend himself against the government’s obviously inferior fire power.

12 Comments

  1. No doubt, Jones is the most passionate gun nut I’ve heard to date. He believes his own stuff and has the gift of gab. These clips are proof that when dealing with ideologues, trying to discourse is futile. Amazing.

    I believe I understand what drives such passion because I have felt it myself, and I don’t think it has anything to do with repelling hordes of government agents. Guns present potential violent power and therefore command attention, attention being something universally desired in society. Have you ever been in a restaurant or other public place when an armed police officer enters, gun displayed in holster? Everyone’s eyes are immediately drawn to the gun. Attention. It’s pretty obvious that Alex Jones likes it too.

    Calling Second Amendment passions “holy” is appropriate, Duane. Like religion, it’s ideology is based on faith, not logic or reason, and Jones’ rants are remarkably like those of a tent preacher.

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    • King Beauregard

       /  January 8, 2013

      And just a reminder, the “remedies” the Second Amendment offers are all treason, the penalty for which is death. Gun worshipers need to read the fine print.

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      • King Beau,

        I published a piece in 2011 titled, Robert E. Lee And The Romance Of Rebellion, in which I wondered why many folks in the South still regard Lee as a hero, a man I characterized, among other things, as a “disloyal Union officer who betrayed his country.”

        I direct you to the comment section of that post, one of the best ever on this blog, and you will see how reluctant some folks are to acknowledge Lee’s treachery.

        Duane

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        • King Beauregard

           /  January 8, 2013

          Awesome post! Yeah, it’s very simple: if you take up arms against the Union, there will be a cost, and part of that cost is that you’re giving up your claim to being a patriot. And if you idolize such a man, realize that you’re siding with traitors.

          Arlington National Cemetery is Robert E. Lee’s estate, confiscated by the Union. I get a kick out of that.

          Anyway, I see your Robert E. Lee and raise you a Ben Grierson:

          http://exiledonline.com/war-nerd-ben-grierson-actual-hero/

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          • Wow. That guy knows his war stuff, no? Very entertaining and I wonder why no one has ever made a movie about Grierson?

            And by the way, what a shame that the Supremes gave the Lee ground back to the Lee family, which later sold it to the government, which later decided that Lee’s mansion was a fitting memorial to him. What a country!

            Duane

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    • Funny you should bring up the image of the police officer, Jim. My sons and I were first in line to get into Allen Field House in Lawrence to see Kansas play Temple on Sunday. Right in front of my nose were two stickers on the window indicating that guns were not allowed inside.no guns in Kansas sticker

      Now, my first thought was, why would anyone want to bring a gun to a college basketball game?  Then I remembered I was in Kansas, a very conservative state even though Lawrence is much more liberal than the rest. Kansans have the right to carry concealed weapons. But the thousands of people standing in that line did not look like gun-toters to me. I would bet you that not more than a handful woke up that day and reached for their gun holsters, ready to start the day. If you’ve ever been to a Jayhawk game in Lawrence, you would know what I mean.

      I said all that to say this: As the line grew longer and longer, and thus the potential for unruliness increased, I started seeing police officers wandering around. And you are right. The first thing I checked when I saw the first one was whether he was armed, which of course he was. It was unmistakable authority not-so-subtly presented to the crowd, which was very civilized, as we should expect any crowd of Americans—of Kansas Jayhawk fans especially!— to be, but nevertheless there was present, as the gun-toting policemen illustrated, the thin blue line of civilization.

      But what if the people standing in line were legally allowed to pack guns in the arena? How many more police officers would be needed to patrol the area? To patrol the game? How much more would the tickets I bought cost in order to pay for the extra protection? Or should KU just allow a few gun-toting fans keep the peace? The NRA tells us there is nothing to fear from concealed-carry laws because the gun-toters are law-abiding folks who actually make an environment safer, right? Why wouldn’t the university simply tell the police to stay home, save the money, and let the law-abiding citizens, guns under their coats, enforce the law?

      Finally, it seems to me that what I witnessed on Sunday was the way 21st-civilization is supposed to be. Americans peacefully gathering for a sporting event, none of them with guns, and the presence of the enforcers of the rules of civilization present just to remind any troublemaking uncivilized bastards that there would be a price to pay for any violence they had a jones to commit.

      And it seems to me that we are less civilized as a people, if some of us feel the need to carry around guns in order to feel safer, to feel, well, empowered. It really bothers me, Jim, that America seems not to be able to fully civilize itself,  but in so many ways remains in the 19th century, when we were shooting our way across the country, conquering someone else’s land.

      Duane

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      • Good points, Duane. While I don’t see any possibility that mankind’s animal nature will evolve appreciably in our’s or our children’s lifetimes the one thing that gives me hope for our species is E. O. Wilson’s theory that cultural memes evolve as well, and likely can do so faster than genes. Examples would be changes in gun laws in the U.K. and Australia. So the question before us is apparently, just how many tots must be violently slaughtered at one time to change America’s collective attitude on gun control laws?

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  2. King Beauregard

     /  January 8, 2013

    Some of you will respond with, “Okay, Alex Jones is a little over-the-top, but he doesn’t speak for us regular gun owners.” The hell he doesn’t! He speaks for you because you’re not willing to put your support behind someone who’s reasonable about guns. If Alex Jones really doesn’t speak for you, tell HIM, not us.

    And some others of you will say, “Okay, Alex Jones is a little over-the-top, but he makes good points.” No, no he doesn’t, and you should listen to that part of you that is ashamed of him, because that’s the part of you that isn’t crazy, scared, and gullible.

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  3. N.Michael Barrows

     /  January 8, 2013

    I would like to share my recent encounter with the Second Amendment. I apologize for the length

    Keep in mind that I reside in Kansas, a state that has decided that smoking in certain public venue presents more danger to the occupants than concealing a firearm in that same venue would. On the weekend before Christmas, a friend and I decided to visit a local bar and catch-up with some old friends. Towards the end of the evening, the conversation, as many of late have, turned to gun control and the government. One of the people in the conversation told all of us at the table that “we wouldnt have to worry about anything happening to us, he has his concealed carry license.” Shortly after that statement, and much to my surprise, his gun ended up in my lap. I believe my remark was “nice gun, here ya go” and quickly returned his firearm, about the same time he tells me that it doesnt have a safety, “ya know, for quicker response time.”

    Thankfully, he and the group that was with him, decided to leave shortly after that. But once they reached the sidewalk a distinctive ‘pop,pop’ sound could be heard from inside the bar. I went outside to see the group heading to another bar, with gun owner lowering the gun from the above him, after shooting it in the air.

    Later that evening he fired two more shots into the air, outside of another bar, and was arrested.

    Is this the type of person who is supposed to protect me from the government?

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    • @ Michael,

      Your pistol-packing partner hasn’t had to fend off the feds yet, apparently, but he does confirm my premise in the earlier comment that a lot of the appeal is getting attention. In this case his expectations were, ahem, exceeded. 🙄

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  4. Anonymous

     /  January 9, 2013

    Duane- A while back we talked about how Dems do not play the media game as well as Repubs. Remember the “Free Phone” lady that Repubs keep using to promote the voter fraud paranoia? Well, if the Dems ever start playing hard ball with media I believe they have been served a perfect candidate to use in order to portray all gun freaks in a negative light. This video should be played over and over and over.

    Kabe

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    • Yes, and at least the ObamaPhone lady wouldn’t threaten bloody revolution if she didn’t get a cell phone from the government. Another man, a CEO of a Tennesse company, threatened to start a civil war and murder people over the gun issue. Why isn’t that video playing nonstop on Fox like the ObamaPhone lady?

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